5 Tips for Reducing Inflammation

fitness passion businessInflammation is not only a distressing symptom; it’s also the cause of many health conditions and chronic diseases.

When your immune system causes swelling in various areas of the body, you not only experience pain but also reduced mobility that can hinder your ability to lead an enjoyable and active lifestyle.

While inflammation is one of the most common symptoms experienced by the general public, it is also one of the easiest to treat through proper diet, exercise, physical therapy, medication, and other forms of treatment. In this quick guide, we’ll provide an overview of the five most effective ways to reduce inflammation on your own:

  • 1. Eat the Right Foods

Poor diet is the leading cause of inflammation-causing conditions. In particular, try to steer clear of sugar, excessive meat consumption, processed foods, processed oils, trans fats, and alcohol.

To really facilitate an improvement in your condition, you need to be consuming optimal nutrition sources, which would include leafy green vegetables, citrus fruits, berries, nuts, peppers, spices, fatty fish and avocados. Drinking cucumber or celery juice is another way to reduce inflammation that’s worth mentioning, as this blog post about the benefits of celery juice shows.

  • 2. Perform Inflammation-Reducing Exercises

Exercising might not seem like the best idea when you’re suffering from inflammation, but there are certain activities that will provide light exertion without worsening your condition. The most natural options include moderate walking and hiking, while a more structured approach might include foam rolling, deep breathing, and yoga.

If you have a recurring condition that’s affecting the mobility of a specific area of your body, consult with a physical therapist to develop a stretching regimen that could help you regain range of motion and reduce inflammation. 

  • 3. Stay Optimally Hydrated 

When your body is retaining fluid in certain areas, it may seem counter-intuitive to drink more fluids, but often times inflammation is a defense mechanism used to safeguard against complete dehydration.

Your body may resort to storing fluids in its tissues if it notices that you’re not consuming enough water to fulfill your needs. By staying optimally hydrated throughout the day, you can prevent such fluid storing reactions from occurring. 

  • 4. Get 8 Hours of Sleep Every Night

Sleep is one of the most effective treatments for inflammation. Conversely, sleep deprivation can severely exacerbate or even cause bouts of inflammation that would not have happened if you had been well-rested. Your body regulates and resets all sorts of processes while you’re sleeping, so if you’re low on rest then you’ll face a higher chance of encountering inflammation during the day.

Likewise, it’s important to practice proper sleep posture, as sleeping in certain positions can cause or worsen inflammatory conditions. 

  • 5. Avoid Repetitive Stress and Heavy Impact

Aside from diet, sleep, exercise, and hydration, it’s important to stay away from any activities that could lead to repetitive stress injuries (RSIs). Likewise, try not to do any heavy lifting or high impact sports while you’re attempting to reduce inflammation.

If you have a history of RSIs or are trying to make an effort to rebalance your body’s inflammatory response, it’s best to not do anything that can cause a flare-up. If you’re looking for an intense aerobic activity that’s good for your joints, try swimming instead of jogging or running. 

  • Everyone Deals with Inflammation From Time to Time

In closing, it’s important to realize that inflammation is not a disease, it is a common protective mechanism that everyone experiences occasionally. The problem isn’t the inflammation itself – it’s the foods, activities, habits, and injuries that are causing the condition to begin with.

Thus, by taking the step above you can effectively stop inflammation before it starts, which is always the wisest approach. 

Lastly, I'm starting to tell other women about a health newsletter that I've benefited immensely from and that I highly recommend. I think you might like it, too. If you want, you can sign up here. It's completely free!

Before you go, we'd love to hear from you in the comments below. I'm working hard to build a community here and a big part of that are your contributions! If you have experiences to share, questions, comments, suggestions, or anything else, please leave us a quick comment. I promise to reply!
Ava Moore on EmailAva Moore on FacebookAva Moore on Twitter
Ava Moore
BA, MA Psychology (and Conflict Resolution), University of Cambridge (2007). With a decade of trial and error in psychology and 33 years of navigating my own complex (that's one word for it!) relationships with family, friends, co-workers and men, I hope I have some useful knowledge and skills to share with my readers about making sense of relationships and trying to become a better person every day.

I'm the Chief Editor here at Independent Femme and would love to hear from you.

Pin It on Pinterest