7 Healthy Ways to Cope With the Death of Your Loved One

When your loved one dies, your world completely changes.

Your significant other was someone who knew you in a very intimate manner, and now you’re struggling to understand and cope with what happened. When it comes to grieving, there’s no right or wrong way.

As this is a sudden change, you’re going to experience overwhelming emotions, grieving the loss of your spouse and anxious about your future. But before going onto a widowers dating website in hopes of quickly moving on, it’s important to grieve healthily, so at the right time, you can start building your new life.

Recognize your loss

Losing a loved one is a harrowing life event. People who lose their partners often wonder about how their lives are going to look without them. But it’s important you understand and eventually accept what happened. Though healing from your loss seems impossible right now, before the grieving process can start, you’ll need to accept your loss.

Be easy on yourself

No one knows what to do when they lose someone. There’s no step-by-step guide to cope with the death of a loved one. This is because everyone grieves differently. A multitude of factors can affect the grieving process including the length of your relationship, how your loved one died, your overall relationship, and if you have any children.

While you’re experiencing a spectrum of emotions, don’t pressure yourself to move on or make any major life decisions. Give yourself time, and treat yourself with love and kindness.  

Be mindful of your health

To a Healthy Lifestyle!When you’re grieving the loss of a partner, you’re not focusing on your health. Grieving places a lot of stress on the body. You may not feel like eating or sleeping; however, when grieving, you’re going to have to be aware of these things.

If you’re not eating or sleeping properly, your health will be affected. Avoid adopting unhealthy habits such as drinking and recreational drug use. If you’re struggling to sleep and eat, talk to people in your support system for help.

Release your emotions and thoughts

You’re going to be experiencing an overwhelming plethora of emotions. In some moments, you’ll feel extreme sadness, and in other moments, you’ll feel anxious and fearful. It’s completely normal to feel these emotions. But what’s important is that you express them.

Whether you write down your emotions or share your thoughts and feelings with other people, you need to get them out. This is a significant life event that traumatized you, and the only way to start the healing process is through honest and open self-expression.

Grieve at your own pace

stages of grief in divorceNo one wants to grieve the loss of a loved one. Many people try to push through the grieving process as fast as possible, putting the event in the past. However, that never works. The only way to move forward is to grieve.

There are going to be days where all you want to do is cry in bed, while in some moments, you’ll feel emotionally lighter and you’ll go for a walk. It’s a rollercoaster of emotions, and it’s going to take time. The only person who can tell you when you’re done grieving is you.

Evaluate your social life

After experiencing a loss, your social life is going to shift. If you and your partner socialized with other couples, you may feel a little awkward spending time with them. Until you’re comfortable, avoid going to couples events, and focus on seeing friends one-on-one.

Seek professional support

stages of grief in divorceThough your support system of friends and family do a fantastic job of being by your side, seeking professional support will help you through the grieving process. Seeking support is crucial as many people become depressed after experiencing the loss of a partner.

Rather than turning inward and pushing support away from you, a therapist will be able to help you express your feelings and move forward at your own pace.

Losing a loved one is a tough and emotional event. However, if you use these healthy tips to cope with the death of your loved one, you’ll be able to start a new chapter in your life when it’s right for you.

Also read: Stages of Grief After a Divorce

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Ava Moore
BA, MA Psychology (and Conflict Resolution), University of Cambridge (2007). With a decade of trial and error in psychology and 33 years of navigating my own complex (that's one word for it!) relationships with family, friends, co-workers and men, I hope I have some useful knowledge and skills to share with my readers about making sense of relationships and trying to become a better person every day.

I'm the Chief Editor here at Independent Femme and would love to hear from you.

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