7 Things Recruiters Want To See From Your CV

Be Beautiful and Career DrivenThere are few job opportunities today, and many unemployed graduates. If you’re to stand a chance of even getting to the interview stage, your resume needs to stand out. Did you know that recruiters spend about 7 seconds on your resume before deciding to sign you up for an interview or tossing your application aside? For you to make an immediate impact, your resume has to communicate what recruiters want to see. This includes:

Clear Contact Information

While this might sound too obvious, you’ll be surprised at the number of candidates who don’t include correct contact details. So, include your phone number (including the country dialing code), email address, and current location, at the very least. List this information at the very top of the page.

Relevant Experience

Today’s employers want prospective employees to have some experience in the workforce, even for entry-level positions. Recruiters will take a second look at your resume if they think you’re a viable candidate. That’s why it pays to list your work experiences. Make sure you only include current or/and former tasks that are relevant to the position you’re applying for.

Correct Spelling and Proper Grammar

Any sort of spelling or grammatical errors can raise questions about your capabilities. An error-free resume, on the other hand, shows that you have good attention to detail, are thorough in your work, and have some level of intelligence. The key is to proofread your CV before sending it. Our brains tend to automatically read things the way we intended them to be. In that case, ask someone else to read it, and also run your resume through a spell- and grammar-checker tool to catch any existing errors.

Education and Training

Recruiters are most certainly interested in your academic achievements. Go ahead and list your full education, including dates and the course you took. If you’ve undertaken any additional training like seminars, hands-on training like manual handling, NVQs, as well as online courses like a TEFL certification, include it. For those wondering what an NVQ is –it’s a work-based way of learning that provides you with all the practical skills and knowledge you need to kick-start your career. Check out how to get an NVQ and begin your journey to success.

Numbers

Claiming that you’re good at what you do means nothing without evidence. It helps to back up your accomplishments with actual data. Include things like you produced 12 sales reports for company X every year, reduced costs by 15%, met annual sales goals of $20,000 per year, and so on. Numbers are eye-catching and quite easy to spot in a rather crowded piece of paper.

Relevant Language

Keywords are important throughout your resume. Go through the job description thoroughly and ensure the language used in your resume mirrors it. Avoid too many clichés and instead, use smart, relevant, and meaningful language. Be careful not to use excessive jargon since the person reading your resume may not be an industry or technical expert.

Continuous Employment History

While it’s okay to make a few career switches, recruiters want to see a consistent work history with some long-term positions. In other cases, you may experience an employment gap for one reason or another. Although gaps are understandable, they are a red flag to recruiters. It’s important to explain these gaps in your resume. List what you did during this time –whether you were undertaking further studies, travelling, or volunteering –that can be used to your advantage.

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Ava Moore
BA, MA Psychology (and Conflict Resolution), University of Cambridge (2007). With a decade of trial and error in psychology and 33 years of navigating my own complex (that's one word for it!) relationships with family, friends, co-workers and men, I hope I have some useful knowledge and skills to share with my readers about making sense of relationships and trying to become a better person every day.

I'm the Chief Editor here at Independent Femme and would love to hear from you.

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